Choosing a healthcare data archiver as you move from a legacy system requires careful consideration. Anytime an organization changes its Electronic Health Record (EHR) system, it also needs to consider how to archive the old system’s data.

This is not an easy task. There are many factors to consider when choosing a healthcare archiving tool, such as data size and type, number of users, compliance requirements, and budget.

Choosing the Right Healthcare Data Archiver

While decommissioning your legacy system, you will need to choose a healthcare archiving tool that meets the specific needs of your organization. There are many factors to consider when making this decision, but some of the most important include:

Data Size and Type

The first step is to determine the size and type of data you need to archive. This will help you narrow down your options and find a healthcare archiving tool that can accommodate your data.

For example, if you have structured data (e.g., demographic information, lab results), you will need a solution that will preserve the structure of that data. If you have unstructured data (e.g., free text notes, images), your old legacy system probably doesn’t have the ability to index that data, so you will need a solution that can do that.

One way to reduce the size of your data is to deduplicate it. This means removing duplicate records from your data set.

This can be a time-consuming process, but it is worth doing if you have a large amount of data. Deduplication can help you save storage space and reduce the cost of archiving.

Searchability

Another important factor to consider is searchability. When you archive data, you want to be able to find it again when you need it.

So, you will want to choose a healthcare archiving tool that makes it easy to search for data. Some solutions have built-in search engines that allow you to search by keyword, while others allow you to add your own custom search fields.

Compliance Requirements

Another important factor to consider is compliance requirements. There are many compliance regulations that need to be considered when choosing an archiving solution, such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA), and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX).

These regulations require different levels of security and privacy for different types of data. For example, HIPAA requires a higher level of security for protected health information (PHI) than for other types of data.

Retention Management

In addition to compliance requirements, you also need to consider data retention requirements. Data retention requirements vary by jurisdiction, so you will need to check with your legal team to see what is required in your specific case.

Some archiving solutions have built-in retention management features that allow you to set expiration dates for data and automatically delete it when it reaches that date.

Number of Users

Another important factor to consider is the number of users who will need access to the data. If you have a large number of users, you will need a solution that can scale to accommodate them.

Some solutions are designed for small teams, while others can support thousands of users.

Cost

Finally, you need to consider cost. Healthcare archiving can be a costly endeavor, so you will want to choose a solution that is affordable for your organization. Some solutions are free, while others can cost thousands of dollars per year.

Conclusion

Decommissioning your legacy healthcare system can be a daunting task, but it doesn’t have to be. By choosing the right healthcare archiving tool, you can make the process much easier.

There are many factors to consider when choosing an archiving solution, such as data size and type, searchability, compliance requirements, retention management, number of users, and cost.

MediQuant offers healthcare archiving solutions that can help you archive your data quickly, easily, and compliantly. For more information about MediQuant, please visit our website or contact us today.

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